Level of inflammatory cytokines in rheumatoid arthritis patients: Correlation with 25-hydroxy vitamin D and reactive oxygen species

Citation: Mateen S, Moin S, Shahzad S, Khan AQ (2017) Level of inflammatory cytokines in rheumatoid arthritis patients: Correlation with 25-hydroxy vitamin D and reactive oxygen species. PLoS ONE 12(6): e0178879. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0178879
Published: June 8, 2017

Abstract
Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune inflammatory disorder. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and pro-inflammatory cytokines have been believed to be involved in the etiopathogenesis of the disease. The aim of the study was to determine the correlation of inflammatory cytokines with 25-hydroxy vitamin D and ROS.
Methods: 100 RA patients and 50 healthy age and sex matched individuals were included in the study. Patients were further divided on the basis of presence or absence of rheumatoid factor and disease severity. Serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels were monitored by chemiluminescent immunoassay. 10% hematocrit was used to detect the level of ROS by spectro fluorometer. The levels of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-17) were determined in plasma by ELISA.
Results: The level of 25-hydroxy vitamin D was found to be decreased in RA patients in comparison to the control group. However the level of ROS and inflammatory cytokines were found to be elevated in RA patients in comparison with the healthy controls, with the increase being more pronounced in seropositive and RA patients having high disease severity. Inflammatory cytokines showed negative correlation with 25-hydroxy vitamin D and positive correlation with ROS.
Conclusion: This study for the first time shows the association of inflammatory cytokines with 25-hydroxy vitamin D and ROS in RA patients. The results suggest that 25-hydroxy vitamin D being an immune modulator is decreased in the serum of RA patients. Further ROS and cytokines play an important role in the pathogenesis of RA and are responsible for increasing the severity of disease.

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This entry was posted in Primary Care Featured 2, Rheumatology and tagged , , .

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