Total intravenous anaesthesia (TIVA) in otolaryngological surgeries

Abstract

Total intravenous anaesthesia (TIVA) is a technique of anaesthesia that involves the use of intravenous drugs to anaesthetize the patient without the use of inhalational agents. TIVA is becoming a popular mode of anaesthesia in otolaryngological surgeries. This article reviews the entire procedure of TIVA from the otolaryngologist’s perspective. TIVA is very useful in anaesthetizing patients during functional endoscopic sinus surgeries due to its ability to produce controlled hypotension and a post-operative recovery free of vomiting.

Introduction

TIVA is defined as a technique of general anaesthesia that involves the use of intravenous drugs to anaesthetize the patient without the use of inhalational agents. Chloral hydrate was one of the early anaesthetic agents back in 1870 (1), and Sigismund Elsholtz first attempted intravenous anaesthesia in 1665 (2), but it was the introduction of propofol in 1986 that gave a new lease of life to TIVA.

The current popularity of TIVA has been attributed to the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of propofol and opioids. These drugs are ultra short-acting and therefore suitable for continuous infusion. With the advent of advanced computer-based drug administration systems, intravenous drug administration has become safer and more predictable. The currently available intravenous drug delivery system allows the anaesthetists to vary the depth of anaesthesia just by controlling the infusion rate of the drug. This is, in fact, similar to that of conventional inhalational systems currently available.
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This entry was posted in Otolaryngology (ENT), Primary Care and tagged , , . Volume: .

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