Prevalence of Trachoma in Car-Nicobar Island, India after Three Annual Rounds of Mass Drug Administration with Azithromycin

Citation: Malhotra S, Vashist P, Gupta N, Kalaivani M, Satpathy G, Shah A, et al. (2016) Prevalence of Trachoma in Car-Nicobar Island, India after Three Annual Rounds of Mass Drug Administration with Azithromycin. PLoS ONE 11(7): e0158625. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0158625
Published: July 8, 2016

Abstract
Entropion_and_trichiasis_secondary_to_trachoma_A44-652-11Background: A high proportion of active trachoma infection in children of Car-Nicobar Island was reported through the Trachoma Rapid Assessment survey conducted in year 2010 by the same researchers. Annual mass drug treatment with azithromycin was administered from years 2010–12 to all individuals residing in this island for reducing the burden of active trachoma infection. A cross-sectional prevalence survey was conducted in the year 2013 to assess the post-treatment burden of trachoma in this population.
Methods: In the 15 randomly selected compact segments from each village of the island, children aged 1–9 years were examined for evidence of active trachoma infection and participants aged ten years and above were examined for trachomatous trichiasis and corneal opacity.
Results: A total of 809 children (1–9 years) and 2735 adults were examined. Coverage with azithromycin for all the three rounds was more than 80%. The prevalence of active trachoma infection in children aged 1–9 years old was 6.8% (95% CI 5.1, 8.5) and Trachomatous Trichiasis (TT) was 3.9% (95% CI 3.2, 4.6). The risk factors associated with active trachoma infection were older age and unclean faces. The risk factors associated with TT were older age and lower literacy level.
Conclusion: Trachoma has not been eliminated from Car-Nicobar Island in accordance to ‘Global Elimination of Trachoma, 2020’ guidelines. Sustained efforts and continuous surveillance admixed with adequate programmatic response is imperative for elimination of trachoma in the island.

...

Log in or register for free to continue reading
Register Now For Free Already Registered? Log In
This entry was posted in Ophthalmology, Primary Care and tagged , .

Post a Comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.