Monthly Archives: April 2014

Top Myths About Vision in Indian Children

Myth: Eating carrots improves your vision. Fact: Vitamin A aids in the normal functioning of eyes. Carrots are a good source of vitamin A, but green leafy vegetables and fresh fruits are rich in it as well. In addition to vitamin A, these other vegetables also contain greater amounts of… 

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25 Years after Vi Typhoid Vaccine Efficacy Study, Typhoid Affects Significant Number of Population in Nepal

It has been almost 150 years since Eberth first identified Salmonella Typhi (S. Typhi) for the first time; one of the very first bacteria to be isolated at the time [1]. In spite of advances in preventive medicine, humans continue to suffer from typhoid and paratyphoid fever. The symptoms of typhoid fever range from…

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Significantly Lower Anti-Leishmania IgG Responses in Sudanese versus Indian Visceral Leishmaniasis

The great majority of the estimated 200,000 to 400,000 annual new cases of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) occurs in six countries, with India having the highest estimated incidence in the world (146,700 to 282,800/year), Sudan having the highest in Africa (15,700 to 30,300/year) and Brazil having the highest in the Americas (4,200 to 6,300/year) [1]. In South Asia and East Africa, VL is caused…

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Strong Association between Serological Status and Probability of Progression to Clinical Visceral Leishmaniasis in Prospective Cohort Studies in India and Nepal

Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a vector borne infectious disease that is endemic in parts of Asia, Africa, South America and Europe, and is caused by different species of the genus Leishmania. In South America and the Mediterranean region, the disease is mainly caused by Leishmania infantum, which is a parasite of dogs opportunistically transmitted to humans.

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Clinical Features and Outcome in Children with Severe Plasmodium falciparum Malaria: A Meta-Analysis

Although most of the 500 million clinical cases of malaria due Plasmodium falciparum estimated to occur globally are uncomplicated [1], some (1–4%) are considered severe enough to require hospitalization and/or parenteral antimalarial treatment [2]. In children, the term ‘severe malaria’ is currently applied…

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Risk Factors and Outcomes Stratified by Severity of Acute Kidney Injury in Malaria

Citation: Saravu K, Rishikesh K, Parikh CR (2014) Risk Factors and Outcomes Stratified by Severity of Acute Kidney Injury in Malaria. PLoS ONE 9(3): e90419. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0090419 Published: March 13, 2014 Abstract Severe acute kidney injury (AKI) is known to have prognostic value for in-hospital outcomes in malaria. However, little is… 

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Rapid Clinical Assessment to Facilitate the Triage of Adults with Falciparum Malaria, a Retrospective Analysis

Almost all patients with severe falciparum malaria will be managed in a resource-poor setting without prompt access to pathology and radiology services. While there are prognostic tools to…

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